Archives for posts with tag: shopping

Facebook has started rolling out “Photo Sync” which allows Facebook at access and automatically upload photos you take on your device anywhere. The photos go into a private folder on Facebook’s servers and you approve the ones you’d like to share or delete the ones you don’t. This feature is not new, Dropbox, Google+ and Apple have allowed photo syncing for a while. Facebook just wants to make it easier to share your memories faster.

Not everyone has the feature yet, Facebook told The Verge the company is rolling it out in test batches to iOS. Android users have had the feature since August.

How does this impact media? Simple. It just got a whole lot easier for companies to upload images of events and promotions, much quicker. Take a company like Best Buy. On Black Friday Best Buy could have taken pictures of the crowds and the best door buster deals moments before the doors opened. Then the photos would be uploaded to the store’s Facebook page and shoppers could tag themselves or see the deals they are all fighting for. Allowing a store to upload photos in different ways can make for a more integrated experience.

When I was standing in line for an hour, I was checking my Facebook and other social media outlets for mentions of deals people were finding as they were going into stores. Additionally, I was checking Best Buy and others to find the best price on PS3s, TVs, and other games. Having everything right in front of me would have made for a much different experience. I would have felt more confident going into that Best Buy.

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Retailers are starting to experiment with “shoppable videos.” These YouTube videos have embedded boxes laid on top of the video and allow the view to click on items the retailer wants them to purchase. In Juicy Couture’s new “California Dreaming” video, boxes faintly appear over new items available in Juicy’s collection.

Shoppable videos can have a lot of implications for retailers as they create video content and expect the user to click through to get more information. However, is it worth it?

KISSmetrics found 64-85 percent of people are more likely to buy a product after watching a product video. And comScore found that 38 percent of people feel online videos are more memorable than TV ads.  The company, Shoeline.com, said it saw online sale conversions increase by 44 percent because they used videos to showcase their products. Other merchants like Archie McPhee saw an increase by 30 percent, and Treepedia found a ecommerce video platform increased conversion rates from 14 to over 113 percent based on different products.

So to answer whether “shoppable videos” are worth it, they very much are.

As consumers we can expect more videos to shop products to us. As FastCompany says, there will soon be a day when you can click on an outfit from your favorite show and wear what the cast is wearing; we aren’t there yet, but this brings us a little bit closer.

What do you think? Cool or lame? Can shoppable videos change the way you shop online? Let your reactions in the comments below.