Archives for posts with tag: browsing

Do you still type “g-o-o-g-l-e-.-c-o-m” into your search bar? Any chance you scroll endlessly looking for key words on a page to no avail? How about clicking through tabs and windows until your computer locks up? Chances are you are not alone. Many people do not know how to use their browsers correctly and efficiently.

For instance, Google’s Chrome browser and Mozilla’s FireFox browser know that if you don’t end a query with “.com” or “.net” etc. you are trying to search a word or phrase. Additionally Crtl+F or Command+F will pull up a “find” search box to help you find what you are looking for on a page. Over 90-percent of people do not use or know how to use the find feature that is built into your browser.

While it is not easy to learn every shortcut if you do not use it everyday, there are many resources to help you learn quickly. One is a video series started by Dan Russell. His videos outline some key feature you may not know about. The series is called “1  Minute Morceaux.” One that will instantly help is using Google to help your spelling:

There are other resources to help make browsing the web easier and more productive. Here is 20 awesome tips for Google’s Chrome broswer.

How does this relate to emerging media? When marketers create content, they need to be mindful of the audience they are catering too. Younger demographics will have a better handle on using technology and the shortcuts it provides, while older generations may be set in their ways. Utilizing search functions, with code that highlights results on a page, will help customers find what they need faster and make them feel like the experience on a company’s website is worth the time.

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Verizon Wireless is launching a new premium ad service for advertisers. The precision marketing effort is called Verizon Selects. The goal is to allow advertisers to send customers advertisements based on the use of the internet and apps on their smartphones. The program also utilizes location data to help deliver coupons and other promotions tailored to a users interests. AT&T has a similar program in place as well.

Verizon defends the service by saying the ads will benefit the user. Before any customers jump ship, Verizon says customers will only be tracked if they opt-in to allow Big Red to track them.

From a marketing stand point, this is very useful information. Learning how people use their smartphones can help marketers understand what people do all day. Are they searching for movie times? Browsing the internet for news? Playing Angry Birds? Buying products from websites? Ultimately, advertisers and companies can take this information and make the user experience better on mobile handsets. Whether it is creating websites optimized for a 4-inch screen or creating apps that deliver a richer experience with a company.

Imagine walking into a grocery store and getting a coupon for your favorite ice cream because you favorited the item in the store’s app. While some people may think that is scary, it actually makes your shopping experience better. Try it for a little bit. See if the companies deliver a better user experience. You can always opt-out.

Obviously the fear of the information being abused is always there. That is why it is always important to understand who and what is accessing your information. Verizon and AT&T have made it easy for customers to disable the collection of proprietary network information. Click here for Verizon and here for AT&T.

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