Archives for category: IMC 619

It has been a great year for big companies and for start ups in advertising. Here are my top 10 favorite ads of 2012 in no particular order.

1. Dollar Shave Club

Breakout success in viral marketing. Dollar Shave Club got exposure across many different outlets.

2. Nike Find Your Greatness

The Olympics welcomed many memorable advertisements. Including this one from Nike.

3. AT&T Olympics

AT&T went above and beyond for this advertisement. They incorporated results from events the day before including writing the exact times on the white board. Fast Company wrote about AT&T pulled this off.

4. Red Bull Stratos

Arguably one of the most successful campaigns.

5. Old Milwaukee

These bizarre, yet amazing commercials went viral and are still a huge hit.

6. Samsung Next Best Thing

Looking to break the mold of iPhone dominating culture, Samsung shook things up with this campaign.

7. Axe Susan Glenn

I put this video on this list simply because it didn’t involve some weird chocolate human being chased by women. Plus Kiefer Sutherland is a badass who shows he had someone he was scared of once.

8. DirecTV Charlie Sheen

Not a big fan of the Charlie Sheen craze, but this commercial by DirecTV did capture my attention.

9. Adidas The Return of Rose

While I might be biased because I am from Chicago, the Return of Rose campaign got me excited for basketball and for Derrick Rose’s return to the Chicago Bulls.

10. Google Chrome Jess Time

Google’s push for an interesting, captivating reason to switch to Google Chrome connected with millions thanks to Jess’s story.

Let me know your favorites for the year in the comments below.

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How many kids are using mobile devices that collect device information from them? The Children Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) was enacted to protect children and ensure their information that is collected from a website is protected. Now the government and major companies are working together to update the COPPA to include mobile devices and protect kids from apps that collect very personal information.

The FTC asked many developers to figure out how to provide more information to consumers in order to have them understand what data is being collected from apps. While apps do present a privacy policy before they are downloaded, there is not enough being done to keep people informed about what data is being collected and what is being done with that information.

After studying apps, the FTC found apps would pass along geographical information and phone numbers. The apps collected information and did not disclose what they did with the information. Clearly apps like these need to be addressed and developers need to be more forthcoming in what they are doing with the information they collect.

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Do you still type “g-o-o-g-l-e-.-c-o-m” into your search bar? Any chance you scroll endlessly looking for key words on a page to no avail? How about clicking through tabs and windows until your computer locks up? Chances are you are not alone. Many people do not know how to use their browsers correctly and efficiently.

For instance, Google’s Chrome browser and Mozilla’s FireFox browser know that if you don’t end a query with “.com” or “.net” etc. you are trying to search a word or phrase. Additionally Crtl+F or Command+F will pull up a “find” search box to help you find what you are looking for on a page. Over 90-percent of people do not use or know how to use the find feature that is built into your browser.

While it is not easy to learn every shortcut if you do not use it everyday, there are many resources to help you learn quickly. One is a video series started by Dan Russell. His videos outline some key feature you may not know about. The series is called “1  Minute Morceaux.” One that will instantly help is using Google to help your spelling:

There are other resources to help make browsing the web easier and more productive. Here is 20 awesome tips for Google’s Chrome broswer.

How does this relate to emerging media? When marketers create content, they need to be mindful of the audience they are catering too. Younger demographics will have a better handle on using technology and the shortcuts it provides, while older generations may be set in their ways. Utilizing search functions, with code that highlights results on a page, will help customers find what they need faster and make them feel like the experience on a company’s website is worth the time.

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Verizon Wireless is launching a new premium ad service for advertisers. The precision marketing effort is called Verizon Selects. The goal is to allow advertisers to send customers advertisements based on the use of the internet and apps on their smartphones. The program also utilizes location data to help deliver coupons and other promotions tailored to a users interests. AT&T has a similar program in place as well.

Verizon defends the service by saying the ads will benefit the user. Before any customers jump ship, Verizon says customers will only be tracked if they opt-in to allow Big Red to track them.

From a marketing stand point, this is very useful information. Learning how people use their smartphones can help marketers understand what people do all day. Are they searching for movie times? Browsing the internet for news? Playing Angry Birds? Buying products from websites? Ultimately, advertisers and companies can take this information and make the user experience better on mobile handsets. Whether it is creating websites optimized for a 4-inch screen or creating apps that deliver a richer experience with a company.

Imagine walking into a grocery store and getting a coupon for your favorite ice cream because you favorited the item in the store’s app. While some people may think that is scary, it actually makes your shopping experience better. Try it for a little bit. See if the companies deliver a better user experience. You can always opt-out.

Obviously the fear of the information being abused is always there. That is why it is always important to understand who and what is accessing your information. Verizon and AT&T have made it easy for customers to disable the collection of proprietary network information. Click here for Verizon and here for AT&T.

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McDonald’s is trying again to capture a Twitter audience, clearly learning from it’s previous missteps. McDonald’s has released a new commercial using its tie-in with the upcoming Pro Bowls and promoting the hashtag, #McDProBowl.

The campaign will be running over the next few weeks as colleges all around the country get ready for their championships. Rick Wion, director of social media for McDonald’s, told Mashable that the brand chose Twitter because of “the amount of conversation going on there” around the game.

This isn’t the first time McDonald’s tried a hashtag campaign. At the beginning of 2012, McDonald’s tried to tell the stories of its suppliers using the hashtag, #McDStories. However, the Twitter universe used the hashtag to tell their own horror stories of their experiences at McDonald’s.

Here are a few gems, courtesy of Gizmodo.

mcdstories

McDonald’s has learned from the #McDStories debacle. This time it shows. #McDProBowl is a lot harder to take advantage of, unless people post their #McDStories from the Pro Bowl…but that is less likely.

While hashtag campaigns are not new, this does mark one of the few times a major company like McDonald’s is trying it. A few other noteworthy successes have been Edge Shave Gel’s #SoIrritating campaign, Ben & Jerry’s #FairTweets promoting fair trade around the world, and The White House’s #40Dollars campaign for the payroll tax cut.

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Bei Maejor is going to be the next Justin Bieber, at least according to future prediction by Shazam. The music tagging service is using the data it currently has from tags and internet hype to predict who is going to make it big in the next year. This is a more fun application of something called, Predictive Analytics.

The is nothing new. Companies and organizations have been using predictive analytics for years. The whole process is done through combining previously recorded data, watching trends, and plotting the data to see how history repeats itself and make predictions for the future.

One application for predictive analytics that has had a significant impact is in law enforcement. Police are looking at crime trends from years past to predict where crimes are going to happen in the future. CNN found the Santa Cruz Police Depart has used a predictive analytic system to monitor burglaries in the area. Thanks to the software, burglaries have dropped 19-percent over the course of a year.

The technology isn’t just used to catch criminals or predict the next Rhianna. Scientists use predictive analytics to forecast weather catastrophic like earthquakes, droughts, and hurricanes.  However the methods aren’t perfect. Six Italian scientists were jailed for the April 6th, 2009 earthquake that struck the Italian medieval city of L’Aquila and killed 308 people. The scientists were found to have been negligent for downplaying the potential of a catastrophic earthquake, due to the data showing the possibility was low.

Predictive Analytics is not a perfect science. It does not account for the variable of the unknown. However it can give us insight into what the future holds.

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Facebook has started rolling out “Photo Sync” which allows Facebook at access and automatically upload photos you take on your device anywhere. The photos go into a private folder on Facebook’s servers and you approve the ones you’d like to share or delete the ones you don’t. This feature is not new, Dropbox, Google+ and Apple have allowed photo syncing for a while. Facebook just wants to make it easier to share your memories faster.

Not everyone has the feature yet, Facebook told The Verge the company is rolling it out in test batches to iOS. Android users have had the feature since August.

How does this impact media? Simple. It just got a whole lot easier for companies to upload images of events and promotions, much quicker. Take a company like Best Buy. On Black Friday Best Buy could have taken pictures of the crowds and the best door buster deals moments before the doors opened. Then the photos would be uploaded to the store’s Facebook page and shoppers could tag themselves or see the deals they are all fighting for. Allowing a store to upload photos in different ways can make for a more integrated experience.

When I was standing in line for an hour, I was checking my Facebook and other social media outlets for mentions of deals people were finding as they were going into stores. Additionally, I was checking Best Buy and others to find the best price on PS3s, TVs, and other games. Having everything right in front of me would have made for a much different experience. I would have felt more confident going into that Best Buy.

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Retailers are starting to experiment with “shoppable videos.” These YouTube videos have embedded boxes laid on top of the video and allow the view to click on items the retailer wants them to purchase. In Juicy Couture’s new “California Dreaming” video, boxes faintly appear over new items available in Juicy’s collection.

Shoppable videos can have a lot of implications for retailers as they create video content and expect the user to click through to get more information. However, is it worth it?

KISSmetrics found 64-85 percent of people are more likely to buy a product after watching a product video. And comScore found that 38 percent of people feel online videos are more memorable than TV ads.  The company, Shoeline.com, said it saw online sale conversions increase by 44 percent because they used videos to showcase their products. Other merchants like Archie McPhee saw an increase by 30 percent, and Treepedia found a ecommerce video platform increased conversion rates from 14 to over 113 percent based on different products.

So to answer whether “shoppable videos” are worth it, they very much are.

As consumers we can expect more videos to shop products to us. As FastCompany says, there will soon be a day when you can click on an outfit from your favorite show and wear what the cast is wearing; we aren’t there yet, but this brings us a little bit closer.

What do you think? Cool or lame? Can shoppable videos change the way you shop online? Let your reactions in the comments below.

It seems much of today’s world is consumed by media and it’s changing how we interact with each other. So many people do not refer to renting the latest movie, but watching the newest additions on Netflix. Party  invites are sent via Facebook and a hello is send in a 3 character “hey” text message. Never before have people been able to upload a file to a storage cloud like Google Drive or Dropbox and have access to it anywhere in the world with an internet connection. Technology is changing our world around us and for the better.

Wayne Arnold from AdAge.com, posted his Ten Digital Trends for 2012. The take away from his list is that more and more people will want their media experience to be personal. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, etc. will all have family and friends only the user would like to share that world with. Google Plus is the best representation with “circles” and categorizing contacts by their relevance to the user.

As media continues to evolve, it will continue to be tied to devices and more so the ecosystem people create for themselves. One example of this is Microsoft and the new Windows 8. Microsoft is trying to create the same ecosystem Google and Apple have created. Microsoft’s Surface is the first step to create a connected world that goes beyond the Windows 8 desktop. Nokia is set to release it’s flagship Lumia 920 in the upcoming weeks, this will be yet another step to creating an ecosystem for Windows. Nokia’s CEO, Stephen Elop has talked extensively about creating a Windows ecosystem. Even tell The Verge, he want competition from Nokia’s biggest ally, Microsoft:

“We’re encouraging of HTC and Samsung and Microsoft or whomever to have devices in the market and to be making whatever investments that helps spur the ecosystem on.”

Whether it is Google, Apple, Microsoft, or another company, people will continue to build their own media experience. Through devices, applications, programs, websites and other outlets, everyone will create their own ecosystem.